HOW ARE WE BEING CALLED?

Dear Friends,

I’ve been reading a lot about what Christians should be doing at this time in history. I agree with a lot of what’s been written:

  • What are we called into if not solidarity with the life force of our planet, all creatures great and small?
  • What are we called into if not solidarity with the lives and living of those seeking refuge, those persecuted for faith, for gender, for racial heritage?
  • What are we called into if not solidarity with those deprived of economic equality, humane treatment, religious freedom?
  • What are we called into if not solidarity with those who are marginalized in the world?
  • What are we called into if not speaking truth to power?
  • What are we called into if not proclamation of the Gospel of loving relationship witnessed in the birth of the Christ child at Christmas, the witness of the cross, and the truth of resurrection?

What we are called into is beyond question.

But how are we being called?

I worry that in our zeal to

stand in solidarity with those who are rightfully fearful and endangered in this world we may further fear and danger for others in this world. I worry that in vilifying those who respond to calls to be fearful, to feel threatened, to struggle for survival against incomprehensible change we will repeat some of the sins of our past.

Let us not forget that, as an institution and as individuals (or at least this individual) we have vilified, marginalized, instilled fear and offered deep threat and willful disregard to hundreds and thousands and hundreds of thousands of God’s beloved creations.

Let us not forget that, even now, we walk a path of reconciliation and renewed relationship with those we have harmed. Let us not forget that there are those who are so bound in what we helped perpetuate that they will never know the freedom of forgiveness, never know the light of life beloved. Because of our church, our government, our institutions and, at least in my case, our direct, personal acts.

Let us not forget our history so that, in taking a stance of Solidarity, we do not further the popular (in some quarters) stance of ‘othering’ those who act out of fear based rage, out of the anger that rises from grief (acknowledged or unacknowledged), loss, suffering and sorrow.

Let us not, in our strong and vital proclamation of the Gospel, forget that the gospel of love is not furthered by hate.

Let us not forget that as we are from God, all are from God, all are beloved in God.

All. Are. Beloved.

Let us not forget.